Siebe, Gorman & Co. Ltd. 12-bolt helmet (with second style cast brass badge riveted onto the breastplate showing the company name)

The first version of a ‘SIEBE GORMAN & Co. Ltd’ helmet has a cast brass badge, this helmet however has the second style of this cast badge From: Helmet collection pieds-lourds.com; photographs, David L.Dekker

Siebe, Gorman & Co. Ltd. 12-bolt helmet (with fifth style ‘flat’ brass badge riveted onto the breastplate showing the company name)

A younger version of a ‘SIEBE GORMAN & Co. Ltd’ helmet which has a flat brass badge. The badge with this final company name exists in almost a dozen different variations. This helmet was used with the ‘South African Railways’ and according to its serial number it should be built around 1958. Photographs, David L.Dekker

1975 / 1980. Siebe, Gorman & Co. Ltd. 12-bolt helmet (with ninth style ‘flat’ brass badge riveted onto the breastplate showing just ‘SIEBE GORMAN’)

And last but not least: the youngest version of a ‘SIEBE GORMAN & Co. Ltd’ helmet which has a flat brass badge with only the words ‘SIEBE GORMAN’ on it. This helmet was built after 1975, the year that the company moved from London to Gwent, Wales. The sales of the old style copper helmets had dropped dramatically by then and Siebe Gorman decided not to move the old craftsmen along, they were sent home instead. When the company did get orders for copper helmets afterwards they were made of a lesser quality: the air ducts were missing inside the helmet, the tunnel of the exhaust valve was missing, the texts at the brailes were missing too. This helmet spent its life in the store room of a diving company in Belgium and according to its serial number it is currently the youngest Siebe Gorman helmet around. Do you have or know a Siebe Gorman helmet with a serial number higher then 19904 then please contact me. Thanks.. Photographs, David L.Dekker

An ‘Admiralty Pattern’ helmet with first style ‘flat’ company badge.

The helmet at the pictures above has the first style flat company badge which was introduced after the thick cast company badges. The side-grills have the bars ‘passing over’ ( younger helmets have side-grills at one level ) and the spit-cock still is the old ‘drop style’ ( younger helmets have the flat bottom spit cock ) This helmet was made for civil use: military helmets has a non return valve which can be entirely screwed off the helmet to be able to test them at the air-pump, this helmet’s non return valve is the fixed type. Photographs David L.Dekker

1904 - 2000. Siebe, Gorman & Co. Ltd. (part 1)

In 1904 the trade-name changes from ‘Siebe, Gorman & Co.’ to ‘Siebe, Gorman & Co Ltd’ after weapons manufacturer Vickers bought the company. The badge with this final company name exists in almost a dozen different variations which we will not all expose here but some variations are shown on the helmets in this chapter.

‘DiveScrap’Index

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